10 Best Parks in Boston

Boston is home to several beautiful parks that offer a peaceful escape from the hustle and bustle of city life۔ One of Boston’s best parks is Boston Common, the oldest public park in the United States۔ With its lush green spaces, serene pools, and historic monuments, Boston Common is a favorite destination for locals and tourists alike۔ Another must-visit park in Boston is the Arnold Arboretum, a botanical garden run by Harvard University۔ The park is a paradise for nature lovers, with more than 15,000 plants from around the world spread over 281 acres of land۔ For those looking for stunning waterfront views, Christopher Columbus Waterfront Park is the perfect choice۔ Located next to Boston Harbor, the park offers breathtaking views of the water, as well as a beautiful primed for a leisurely stroll۔ Whether you’re looking for tranquility, nature, or scenic views, Boston’s parks have something for everyone to enjoy۔ 10 Best Parks in Boston

1. Public Garden

The Boston Public Garden, located near the Boston Common, is separated from the sister parks by Charles Street. The park was established in 1837 and was the nation’s first publicly owned botanical garden. Spring is the best time to visit the garden as it blooms with cherry blossoms from the end of March to the end of May. In addition to cherry blossoms, the garden also blooms with roses and other ornamental blooms. The park is also home to lush grass and trees, making it a great spot to view fall foliage in the city. Perhaps the park’s most famous feature is the four-acre pond which is home to a couple of swans and other aquatic birds such as mallard ducks. Swan Boats are one of the best things to do with your kids in Boston. These open-air boats, which feature bench-style seating, are a great way to enjoy a 15-minute round-about ride around the little man-made lake. Lake Mallard Island is home to the nesting grounds of the mallard ducks. Swans nest along the banks of the pond during spring and early summer.

2. Boston Common

Boston Common is the oldest public park in the United States, having been established in 1634. Locals call it simply “the Common.” The 50-acre park is the centerpiece of Boston’s Emerald Necklace and is surrounded by the city’s Chinatown and the Back Bay neighborhoods. Over the centuries, the Common has seen many different uses. It began as a cattle pasture, served as a military camp during the Revolutionary War and the Civil War, and served as a victory garden during World War I and World War II. It also serves as the home of the central burial ground, where many of the Boston Tea Party’s participants are buried. In recent years, the Common has been a popular gathering place for people from all walks of life, such as during the Civil Rights Movement and other peaceful demonstrations. It also served as the staging area for Boston’s major parades during the 1960s and 1970s. If you’d like to learn more about the history of the park, you’ll want to visit the Boston Visitors Center. It’s the start of the Boston Freedom Trail and provides great information on what’s happening in the park today.

3. Rose Kennedy Fitzgerald Greenway

For people living in and around the North End, the Greenway is much more than a park. It symbolizes the epic transformation of the aging, cement eyesore that used to be the Central Artery into a beautiful green space. Completed in 2008 as part of Boston’s “Big Dig,” the Greenway is 1.5 miles long, totaling 17 acres of parkland. It’s a favorite for kids of all ages, too, but kids especially love the “Greenway Carousel”, a unique ride that was inspired by the drawings of local children. The park’s creator, Newburyport’s Jeff Briggs, brought those drawings to life, creating a ride that’s not only fun for kids, but also accessible for those with disabilities. Many of the park’s many fountains were designed for both beauty and function, allowing visitors to cool down in the spray of the fountains. Public art is also a big part of the Greenway, with many of its installations being interactive and changing regularly. Visitors can spend the better part of the day strolling around the park, stopping at food trucks and finding shady spots to

4. Back Bay Fens

Back Bay Fens was designed by landscape architect Frederick law Olmstead and transformed an area of saltwater-soaked marsh into a beautiful, safe, and functional park. It is the name of the neighborhood and is home to the historic Fenway Park. There is a small children’s playground called “Mother’s Rest,” and the WWII Memorial is a great place to pause and reflect. It’s located in the middle of the park, next to the beautiful Kelleher rose garden, with its rose-tiled arches and fountain. At the south end, there’s a track that leads to a multi-use athletic field known as “Clemente Field.” This beautiful wetland is also a great spot for bird-watchers, as it is home to a variety of native fowl, including the Great Blue Heron, Indigo Bunting, Eastern Kingbird, Wood duck, and Red-tailed Hawk. The Fens is home to a number of historical landmarks, including the Japanese Temple Bell built in 1675 and the “Duck House” (a stone roadhouse built in 1897). The Westland Gate was built in 1905 and the neo-goth

5. Franklin Park

Franklin Park is the largest open space in Boston and is south of Downtown Boston. It is located in the Jamaica Plain neighborhood, Roxbury neighborhood, and in the Roslindale neighborhood. It is another of the many green masterpieces designed by Frederic Law Olmstead in the 1890s and covers an area of 485 acres. The Franklin Park Zoo is one of the park’s most popular attractions. It is a 72-acre zoo that opened in 1912 and features a wide variety of animals, including African lions, Masai giraffes, 2-toed sloths, kangaroos, and lemurs. The zoo also has a butterfly house and two aviaries, as well as a kids’ farm where visitors can get up close and personal with farm animals. The park also has an 18-hole public golf course, the oldest in the country, basketball and tennis courts, soccer and rugby fields, baseball and lacrosse fields, as well as several playgrounds. In the summer, the playhouse in the park is open for outdoor theater performances. Ellicott Arch, Scobee Pond, and the Bell Tower are other places to visit.

6. Arnold Arboretum

Franklin Park, the largest open space in Boston, is situated south of Downtown, along the Jamaica Plain-Roxbury-Roslindale-Dorchester line. It is another of the city’s many green masterpieces. Designed in the late 19th century, Franklin Park covers an area of 485 acres. The park’s most popular attraction is the 72-acre Franklin Park Zoo. The zoo opened in 1912 and features an impressive array of animals, including African lions, giraffes, zebras, sloths, kangaroos, and lemurs. There’s also a butterfly house and two aviaries as well as a kids’ farm where visitors can get up close and personal with farm animals. The park is home to many sports facilities, including the 18-hole Franklin Park Golf Course, the country’s oldest public public golf course. Basketball and tennis courts, soccer and rugby fields, baseball and lacrosse fields, as well as several playgrounds are also available. During the summer, the park hosts open-air theatre performances, as well as the Bell Tower and other attractions.

7. Castle Island & Fort Independence Park

Franklin Park, the largest open space in Boston, is situated south of Downtown, along the Jamaica Plain-Roxbury-Roslindale-Dorchester line. It is another of the city’s many green masterpieces. Designed in the late 19th century, Franklin Park covers an area of 485 acres. The park’s most popular attraction is the 72-acre Franklin Park Zoo. The zoo opened in 1912 and features an impressive array of animals, including African lions, giraffes, zebras, sloths, kangaroos, and lemurs. There’s also a butterfly house and two aviaries as well as a kids’ farm where visitors can get up close and personal with farm animals. The park is home to many sports facilities, including the 18-hole Franklin Park Golf Course, the country’s oldest public public golf course. Basketball and tennis courts, soccer and rugby fields, baseball and lacrosse fields, as well as several playgrounds are also available. During the summer, the park hosts open-air theatre performances, as well as the Bell Tower and other attractions.

8. Christopher Columbus Waterfront Park

The North End’s original family park, long before it got its name from the Greenway that sprouted out of the central artery, was the Columbus Waterfront park. It overlooks Boston Harbor and features vine covered trellises to shade the central pedestrian walkway. When it’s not covered in leaves, this huge archway is festooned with lights to commemorate the winter season. Kids love the “crow’s nest” at the north end, where they can get a bird’s eye view of the boats arriving and departing from Boston Harbor. The Massachusetts Beirut Memorial is next door to the playground. There’s also the Rosalie Kennedy Rose Garden. It’s a picturesque garden with a fountain, shaded benches, and lots of events and festivals happening all year round.

9. Charles River Esplanade

This three-mile section of the Charles River, which dates back to 1910, runs from Boston University Bridge all the way down to the museum of science. There are 17 miles of paths along the Esplanade, where you can run, skate, bike, and take a riverside stroll. You can get to the park by taking one of the many pedestrian bridges that span Storrow Drive, and there are plenty of playgrounds, sports fields, and boat launches along the way. The best part of the park, though, is the bandstand known as the Hatch Shell. When the weather cooperates, the Hatch shell hosts free movies and musical performances. The most famous of these is the Fourth of July concert put on by the Boston pops. 10 Best Parks in Boston

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